Posted October 11, 2016 at 12:17 pm

I just wanted to thank everyone who dropped by our table over the wild NYCC weekend.

Anyone in this business spends a part of every day wondering if they've made a huge mistake. But then you do a show where you can hardly get one and a half sentences into your sales pitch before you hear, "I'll take three," and you come out of it realizing that, yes, comics was a huge mistake, but at least you're making some folks happy while you're doing it.

Meanwhile, here on THE INTERZONE, our family of sites kept updating despite my absence. In case you need a rundown of everything that went down, here is a list of links that is as handy as it is dandy.

Tuesday, Oct 4th: Page 11 of Issue 4 of The Flying She-Devils Raid on Marauder Island. This was also the last day for our most recent Kickstarter campaign, so you no longer have to put up with me talking about it nonstop. Joy!

Wednesday, Oct 5th: Page 15 of Issue 4 of Atomic Robo and the Temple of Od.

Thursday, Oct 6th: Page 12 of She-Devils.

Friday, Oct 7th: Page 16 of Temple of Od.

Monday, Oct 10th: Page 17 of Temple of Od.

Tuesday, Oct 11: Page 13 of She-Devils.

Whew!

Posted October 3, 2016 at 12:07 pm

If you're reading this there are between twenty-four and zero hours left to get your hardcover copy of Atomic Robo and the Ring of Fire, a Robo plush, the Task Force ULTRA Field Manual, and a ton of other great stuff like original cover art (grab it before someone else does, you fool!) and Atomic Robo RPG goodies.

If you missed out on our previous hardcovers, then head on over to the online shop and fix your life.

Or, if you happen to live in the NYC area, then you should head to the graveyard of civilizations, a.k.a. the Javits Center, for NYCC this weekend and come by Artists Alley table G-6 to watch me dance for nickels. Look for the enormous Atomic Robo banner with the ghoulish fellow who looks like he could use a little more coffee.

Scott will not be able to make it to the show due to a knee injury. Comics is rough business, kids. But he is pre-drawing some sketches that you can pick up!

I am starting with 20 slots open. Time permitting and if there is a demand, I will open up more.

To get on the list email us at tesladynellc@gmail.com and put "NYCC 2016 SKETCH" in the subject line.

Sketch Commissions cost $50. You'll pay at the show when you pick up the sketch. Cash or card.

You can request a single figure and I will draw it in pencil, on a 9”x6” acid-free two-ply bristol board and it'll look something like this:

To pre-answer the question I get at every show: no, I cannot squeeze in a second character if you pay for more. The single figure limit isn't due to miserliness, it's due to time. If you want more than one figure, you can purchase multiple sketches if slots are still available!

Posted September 26, 2016 at 12:47 pm

We're going to NYCC this year! Except for Scott who is grounded due to a knee injury!

But, don't worry, Scott has a plan for all you folks who like to get original art from him at the show:

I am unable to attend NYCC this year. However, I know that a lot of you like to get sketch commissions when you attend the show. In order to not disappoint anyone I am taking sketch requests prior to NYCC. Brian will bring them to the show for me and you can pick them up at Table G-6 in Artists Alley!

I am starting with 20 slots open. Time permitting and if there is a demand, I will open up more.

To get on the list email us at tesladynellc@gmail.com and put "NYCC 2016 SKETCH" in the subject line.

Sketch Commissions cost $50. You'll pay at the show when you pick up the sketch. Cash or card. 

You can request a single figure and I will draw it in pencil, on a 9”x6” acid-free two-ply bristol board and it'll look something like this:

To pre-answer the question I get at every show: no, I cannot squeeze in a second character if you pay for more. The single figure limit isn't due to miserliness, it's due to time. If you want more than one figure, you can purchase multiple sketches if slots are still available!

Join me in wishing Scott a speedy recovery so I don't have to hear him complain about it anymore.

Meanwhile, we're in the final week of our Ring of Fire Hardcover, also Robo Head Plush, also Task Force ULTRA Kickstarter campaign! Do check it out if you haven't. In addition to the amazing rewards I just mentioned, there's stickers, posters, original cover art by Scott Wegener, and every Atomic Robo Roleplaying Game item ever developed.

Also: there are more hardcovers and you can get them right here.

Posted September 23, 2016 at 12:02 pm

There’s so much Atomic Robo news going on it’ll make your head spin!

First up! Wanna buy hardcover editions of the first nine Atomic Robo volumes? Because we’re selling them! There is one caveat however! Any order over nine pounds will be split into two packages. After many meetings with our fulfillment center, various shipping companies, and the postal service, we have determined this to be the best method to make sure large orders arrive safely. Details at the end of this post*!

Next! You might’ve heard us mention it about a thousand times, but there’s a Kickstarter for the tenth hardcover running right now. You can also get a plush of Robo’s head, every Atomic Robo Action Science Roleplaying Game product, and original cover art from Atomic Robo and the Ring of Fire by Scott Wegener.

Lastly! Maybe you prefer print issues? Good news! You can pre-order all the remaining issues of Atomic Robo and the Temple of Od at this very moment! Just run down to your local shop and tell them to “Add anything Atomic Robo to my pull list!” but do it politely because they’re human beings too.

You can even make their job easier by telling them the order number.

#3: AUG160486 ← or you can order it online. Or the variant cover by Kei Zama (it looks like this)

#4: SEP160536 ← same with this one. Or the variant cover by Hollie Mengert.

#5: OCT160491 ← but not this one yet or the variant cover by Dave Crosland because *~comic book industry ~* 

 

*One hardcover? No problem! A few hardcovers? Go crazy! But once you get into a stack of about five or more, you’re gambling with whether or not these things will get damaged in transit. And not even from mishandling! Just the act of going through the automated systems. Splitting these larger shipments into two boxes solves the problem!

See, the machinery is designed to accommodate packages up to fifteen pounds. So why is our cut off at nine pounds? The problem is that we’re not sending a 15lb package, we’re sending dozens to hundreds of 15lb packages at the same time. The system is built to take one 15lb package every so often, not huge batches of them all at once. By scaling back our maximum load per box to 9lbs we’re solving two problems at once: 1) it allows us to use extra packing material to make sure everything arrives safely, and 2) it means our packages are much closer to the statistical average weight that’s expected of the various automated systems they must go through before arriving at your door.

So: order as many hardcovers as you want, but please be aware that shipping costs will increase at 9lbs because that’s when we’ve got to send two boxes instead of one.

Posted September 21, 2016 at 12:30 pm

First up! It’s time for a little audience participation. What y'do is, you write up an email, send it to asktesladyne@gmail.com, and then we’ll respond to it in some way, and maybe even print the whole exchange in an upcoming issue of Atomic Robo! Ask us stuff, tell us we’re pretty and smart, or just say hello. Whatever. It’s fun for the whole family. Patrons get priority on all of these matters because they’re the cooooolest* people in the world.

Next. The Kickstarter! You guys are out of control. We’re over $50,000 U.S. American dollareedoos which means we’ve got to beef up the Task Force ULTRA Field Manual with even more pages. I started work on that material earlier this week and it turned into doctrine for various practices relating to the Vampire War? Did you know there was one? Me neither, but now it’s canon and I want to do a Real Science Adventures series about it at some point.

Anyway, spoiler alert, you guys are still throwing cash at us. Which is just as well, since there’s stretch goals a’plenty lined up. The next one is at $55k and that’ll get you a third postcard drawn by one of our radical comics artist friends as well as two more pages of bonus material pulled from The Secret Files of Dr. Dinosaur.

But that ain’t all that’s happening! We talked with the good people at Evil Hat Productions, makers of the Atomic Robo Action Science Roleplaying Game, and they’ve agreed to help us out with yet more rewards. We added two new tiers so you guys can get all the Atomic Robo RPG goodness that exists in the universe. Check ‘em out...

At $115 you get the hardcover of Atomic Robo and the Ring of Fire, the softcover of the Task Force ULTRA Field Manual, both of them as PDFs, all the stretch goal postcards, and every Atomic Robo RPG product that exists: the main book, the supplement for playing as Majestic 12 agents, and a set of 12 Atomic Robo themed Fate Dice.

At $175 you get the hardcover of Atomic Robo and the Ring of Fire, the hardcover version of the Task Force ULTRA Field Manual, the hardcover version of the Tesladyne Field Guide (2013 edition), PDF versions of all of the above, the postcards, and every Atomic Robo RPG product that exists: the main book, the supplement for playing as Majestic 12 agents, and a set of 12 Atomic Robo themed Fate Dice (whew).

Finally, Atomic Robo and the Temple of Od #2 hits comic book stores today. Hit up your local shop, grab a copy, and be sure to add “Anything that says Atomic Robo!” to your pull list if you haven’t already done that for some reason. Or, if you prefer to read comics on your electromatic devices, there's always your pal comiXology.

If you need more incentive, check out the variant cover by Kei Zama for the next issue:

 

 

 

*not really, I’m just sucking up.

 

Posted September 14, 2016 at 12:27 pm

In case you missed it: we're making a hardcover edition of Atomic Robo and the Ring of Fire to match the other hardcovers we made last year.

Oh, and we're making a Plushie Robo Head to go with it. Check out the latest prototype!

(at the $100 tier you get this thing at such a discount the hardcover is basically free)

Now, clearly, most of you have heard of this because you already funded it and knocked out the first batch of stretch goals like they were nothing. And we're on the verge of crossing out the next one!

Dr. Dinosaur, part time campaign manager.

Now, maybe you're thinking, "Hold on, what if I missed out on those previous hardcovers?"

Stay tuned for news on what we can do about that later this week!

Posted August 8, 2016 at 11:41 am

Today, August 8th, is your last chance to pre-order Atomic Robo and the Temple of Od #1 at your local comic shop!

JUN160396 ATOMIC ROBO AND THE TEMPLE OF OD #1 (OF 5) 

JUN160397 ATOMIC ROBO AND THE TEMPLE OF OD #1 (OF 5) VARIANT COVER

Midtown Comics 

There's still time to pre-order #2 and #3, just head on over here for details and links.

MEANWHILE!

Or, rather, THIS WEEKEND!

 

Team Robo is going to Boston Comic Con. It's August 12 - 14th. You'll find us at Table C-810 in Artists Alley where we will be selling hardcovers, posters, IDW's multi-volume collections, and a bunch of other stuff. You should drop by, say hello, and trade your worthless Earth Dollars for our amazing adventure products!

Do I have to draw you a map? 'CAUSE I DID!

CLICKIFY FOR BIGIFY

Posted August 2, 2016 at 11:59 am

Okay, so Atomic Robo and the Temple of Od #1 will go on sale later this month. But the way print comics work is a little goofy. Unless your name is Marvel or DC, there's no guarantee your comics will show up in any given shop!

But there's something you can do about that: PRE-ORDER! 

Just head to your local shop and ask them to pre-order Atomic Robo and the Temple of Od #1 for you. There's two versions of each issue in this series. They're the same except for the cover, so go with whatever makes sense for you.

If you don't have a local comic shop, you can also pre-order either version online. We suggest Midtown Comics, but there's tons of choices out there.

The first issue goes on sale August 24th, but the Final Order Cut-Off for it is August 8th. This means retailers can adjust their pre-orders for this issue until that date. After that? You're outta luck!

JUN160396 ATOMIC ROBO AND THE TEMPLE OF OD #1 (OF 5) 

JUN160397 ATOMIC ROBO AND THE TEMPLE OF OD #1 (OF 5) VARIANT COVER

Midtown Comics

And, hey, while you're pre-ordering that first issue, you may as well grab the next ones!

JUL160594 ATOMIC ROBO AND THE TEMPLE OF OD #2

JUL160595 ATOMIC ROBO AND THE TEMPLE OF OD #2 VARIANT

Midtown Comics

AUG160486 ATOMIC ROBO AND THE TEMPLE OF OD #3

AUG160487 ATOMIC ROBO AND THE TEMPLE OF OD #3 VARIANT

Midtown Comics

Independent comics like Atomic Robo depend upon active support from its readership. Pre-orders are the best way to help us keep going, but they aren't the only way! You can always drop by our online shop or our Patreon. Or whitelist our site for your adblocker. We rigorously police our ads so nothing obnoxious like pop-ups/unders or sound gets through.

Whatever you do, even if it's just reading for free, thank you. Every little bit keeps us going.

Posted July 25, 2016 at 02:11 pm

It's that time again. Thanks to our Patrons we are here to answer your burning questions. And your ordinary questions. Burning is always appreciated but not necessary.

I know you've addressed how ridiculous it would be for Tesladyne to have a child employee or sidekick, and I totally agree with you, but I can't help but wonder... are there any current or former 'boy adventurers' not tied to Tesladyne running around in the setting, a la Jonny Quest or Rusty Venture? (I realize Robo himself kinda sorta counts if you think about it)

Chris S.

There’s bound to be bright kids in Robo’s world. We’ve shown at least one. But I like to think that in Robo’s world, there’s sufficient public funding for programs designed to attract and/or identify these kids and then to encourage them to pursue their interests with some mentorship or guidance to keep them from harming themselves or others.

Maybe that’s unrealistically optimistic, but it’s an unrealistically optimistic setting in a lot of ways!

 

With all the modifications Robo has made on himself - not to mention all the times he's had to have himself rebuilt - Tesladyne had any success with adapting Robo's limbs for prosthetics?

Nicholas P.

Scott and I have talked about this a few times over the years. It seems likely that having Robo running around as a proof of concept for, uh, 90 years would be a huge boon to prosthetics technology. But then it occurred to us that studying Robo’s example would lead to monstrous super prosthetics that would injure the people they’re attached to.

So, it’s had relatively little impact on prosthetics as we think of them. But, on the bright side for our crazy sci-fi series, that means dangerously augmented cyborg bad guys!

 

Dear Robo

What kind of music do you guys listen to?  and do you imagine any sort of soundtrack for your comics?

William E.

These days, while working, I tend to listen to stuff like Perturbator, Makeup and Vanity Set, Kn1ght, Lazerhawk, Kavinsky, Betamaxx, sea shanties (too many Aubrey-Maturin novels + Assassins Creed Black Flag), and Boccherini (Aubrey-Maturin again). So, if it sounds like it came from an ‘80s sci-fi movie, or the age of sail, I’m in.

Not sure how I’d go about making an Atomic Robo soundtrack though. Guess it would depend on the era and tone of the particular story being done. Hopefully there’s a lot of Johnny Cash and Inkspots though.

 

Question 1: In the reprint Kickstarter you have about 45 backers who should be getting their name in the comic and 19 who get their name plus actually appear. I'm curious if you can share your plan on how you are going do this? Is it going to be a gradual one or two here and there or are you planning to name drop everyone en masse?

Question 2: A train leaves from New York City (NYC) heading towards Los Angeles (LA) at 100 mph. Three hours later, a train leaves LA heading towards NYC at 200 MPH. Assume there's exactly 2000 miles between LA and NYC. When they meet, which train is closer to New York City?

Tim N.

Answer 1: I will say this: we’ve already written all the relevant scenes, and if everything goes according to schedule, you should see them before the end of this year. Stay tuned.

Answer 2: Hahaha highspeed transcontinental rail in America lol okay buddy good one.

 

So I recently re-listened to all the Atomic Robo: Nuts and Bolts and that got me thinking about the action scientists. You mention several times that you would like to expand their stories but find it too hard to in comic form as you keep flipping through time. Have you considered the possibility of expanding their backstories in prose, possibly in the form of archives of the Tesladyne Newsletter? 

Steven P.

Yes. And we decided it’d be more fun to use these potential stories as fodder for mini-comics here and there. Either online or as bonus content in print issues.

Which is not to say we’ve ruled out prose as a content delivery platform. Patrons know all about what we’re offering at superexplosive.com for example.

 

Summer is upon us and it is a great time to travel, relieve some stress, and get over past defeats. Do you think Dr. Dino and Robo’s differences could be solved if only they could channel their energy into a more constructive pursuit? Have they considered D&D? Or perhaps board games? They come in app form now for the Dino on the go!

Vanessa L.

I’ll be honest, we never thought about it before. Doctor Dinosaur is not exactly the forgiving type. But now I can’t stop thinking about how we need him and Robo playing chess like Professor X and Magneto in those X-Men movies.\

Now to figure out how the hell we could keep Doctor Dinosaur captured. Everything’s just too Looney Tunes with him around.

 

Indiana Jones, Big Trouble in Little China, The Good The Bad The Weird are all great influences for The Temple of Of and let's not forget the force from Star Wars...Just Awesome! But answer me this, is Helen still alive in the present time? She's an amazing character.

Shawn M.

Well, let’s see. She’s at least twenty-ish by the time we first meet her in The Deadly Art of Science, so she’d have to be born in, let’s say, 1910. That would make her 106 years old if she was alive today.

But she’s not. Helen lives a nice, long life full of adventure, but she has passed away.

 

First of all, thank you for making an amazing comic.

I've always been curious about Robo's birth. Is that something we'll ever get to see? What knowledge and behaviors, if any, was he preprogrammed with? I assume he could walk, move, and control his strength so he didn't risk hurting anyone while trying to learn.

Keely M.

Thanks, Keely!

But, yeah, we generally avoid showing Robo’s “origin” as such. We just don’t need one. Most superhero stories need to tell us how and why these characters can do what they do. We already know how Robo does his amazing feats because it’s right there in his name! He’s atomic powered and he’s a robot. Done.

The why is perhaps less obvious, it’s certainly never explicitly stated, but I like to think we’ve built a case out of Robo’s actions that help readers to infer why he does what he does: because it’s the right thing to do.

 

Hi! Firstly, I'm a huge fan, geeking out, saving up for books on my crappy freelance artist budget, etc. etc.

Okay, now that the formalities are out of the way, I wanted to ask if we'll ever see what happened to Jenkins? I'm with Robo on this one and very highly doubt the explosion got him; it didn't kill the other guy, so he could've survived too. I've got this silly personal theory that he survived the explosion and escaped to some remote part of the island, where he's been camping out a la Bear Grylls with nothing but a knife and his wits. Pretty soon that corner of the island gets declared off-limits or haunted or something by Majestic/Ultra; few who go there ever return, and those who do can only jibber terrified nonsense about the Angry Ghost of Tesladyne Island.

Which is probably not what really happened, but it keeps me from worrying about a fictional character too much, haha!

Audrey M.

Oh, man. What happened to Jenkins is definitely the most popular question we’ve gotten since we started The Ring of Fire.

And our answer is the same now as it has always been: we’re not telling you anything other than what’s on the page. He was in an explosion. He hasn’t been seen since. But the other guy who was there seems to have lived through it (with a cyborg arm). And everyone thinks Jenkins is dead, except for Robo who thinks he must be alive because there’s no body.

And that’s just how it stands!

For now...

 

1: This one's for Dr Dinosaur specifically: What is your Origin Story? I know you have said you have come from the past but I am curious on the full details. Were you once good or evil or just crazy? Did you have anyone you cared for? Why come to the future? Why the hate on us mammals? We just trying to survive man. DX

2: For the creators of this fine adventure: Which of the adventures related to Robo do you think is your finest work? Why is this the case?

3: For anyone willing to answer it: For over a hundred years, and possibly many more in the future, Atomic Robo has advanced the course of science, and dealt with monsters from beyond time, evil men seeking the powers of the gods, and crazy scientist dinosaurs. In all those years, in all that time, what has been the hardest evil he has ever had to face and why? Feel free to go metaphysical on this like the horrors of mankind's desire for power or something if you wish, but I mean along the lines of physical or mental threats to his well being like a evil mad scientist with a death ray or a horror from beyond time or something.

Kyle K.

1. Unlike Robo’s origin, which we don’t show because it’s not interesting, Doctor Dinosaur’s origin is only interesting because we don’t show it. Is he telling the truth? Everything he says sounds crazy and wrong. And, not coincidentally, is crazy and wrong. But then it turns out he’s right just enough that it makes us question if he’s actually crazy and wrong about that other stuff too.

2. Brian: I think The Shadow From Beyond Time was our best overall Robo story, but I’m also partial to Ghost of Station X because it’s given us so much to play with ever since.

Scott: Scott: Flying She-Devils of the Pacific. P.S. I am forever jealous of Lo Baker for getting to draw more She-Devils over at realscienceadventures.com. At least I got to do the covers!

3. That’s a toughie. But I think we have to side with the Shadow From Beyond Time on this one. It did, after all, threaten the existence of the entire universe forever throughout time. That’s pretty big. And, technically, we don’t know if Robo succeeded or not.

 

First, thank you for Atomic Robo! It's a series that's made me smile and laugh when I really need it.

I’m working on a webcomic I want to release soon. How do you make a character that is supremely skilled in some ways but also relatable? Particularly non-human characters? 

Robo is a super strong character with a crap load of intelligence who is just as human as every other character he encounters. Which seems to be one of the points of his character. But all the same, how did you go about making him so relatable? Was it something that came about naturally or did you go out of your way to give him a few flaws that make sense with his character?

Marco G.

Glad you’re enjoying our work, Marco.

And, boy, you’ve asked us a whopper of a question. Here’s my attempt at an answer.

To start, I’m not accusing you of doing this, Marco, I don’t know the first thing about your process. But I see a lot of beginners making the mistake of thinking of characters, especially main characters, as the products of equations. Arrange all the variables in the right order, give them the right values, and output a beautiful creature.

But that’s not how it works. These aren’t D&D characters. You aren’t picking from a list of feats, skills, stats, and flaws from TVTropes all min-maxed to produce maximum audience relatability.

So, relatability is a tough one. It’s not something you can force, it has to arise naturally from what we learn of the character through his or her thoughts and actions.

We kind of cheat with Robo. He has the bare minimum requirements for a face and that subconsciously makes most people project themselves onto him. The moment you see him, you’re relating to him without knowing it.

And then he lives in a big, crazy sci-fi world. And most of the people reading about it are somewhat familiar with the kinds of things that happen in big, crazy sci-fi worlds. And Robo is kind of in on it too. He can share the text’s secret jokes and nods and nudges with the audience. Not in a Deadpool-ish Break-The-Fourth-Wall kind of way, Robo never steps out of the world he inhabits, but his experiences of getting slapped in the head with crazy sci-fi threats for nearly a hundred years gives him the same familiarity the audience probably has with regard to the kinds of threats he’s going to face.

So, Robo gets to be funny, but it’s important that he’s not too funny or falsely funny. Those are two products of the same phenomenon. It’s when the writer pushes too hard to make a joke happen and ends up with a string of words that practically scream out at you, the reader, as unnatural. I never plan Joke Goes Here or labor over dialog for humor. If a line comes out funny, then it’s a funny line. I might give it one more pass to make sure it sounds natural. And I’m not against making a slight tweak to an ordinary line if doing so would turn it into a funny one. But if a gag doesn’t work by that second draft, it’s a sign to cut it. For whatever reason, that moment does not call for a joke, or at least that joke, and the best thing to do is to move on. Maybe that sounds harsh, but I strongly believe in the “KILL YOUR DARLINGS” philosophy of writing.

Anyway, this gives us a heroic character who throws himself into danger while giving voice to the most likely thoughts/reactions of the readers. And then we try to structure the action to put a twist on what the audience has come to expect about what’s happening. This twist often comes as a surprise to Robo too, so he continues to mirror the audience’s feelings.

Actually, there is an equation, and it’s much simpler than D&D. Here it is:

Character wants X, but must overcome Y to get it, and then Z is an unintended/unwanted consequence of attaining it.

That’s your story. Asking yourself questions about each of those variables can tell you about the others. Why does the character want X? Why not something else? What will they do or give up to get X? What would they refuse to do or to give up to get X? Why is Y an obstacle? Why not something else? And so on.

This gets you thinking about your characters in terms of their motivations and outlooks, and it gets you thinking about who and what is aligned against them, and thinking about how and why those are. It’s a process that places the characters in their world and gets them reacting to it in ways that make sense. That’s pretty relatable. Everything else is just details.

 

LOVE the series. It's a gem! 

Question: Is zero-point energy based on anything beyond your imagination? The concept? The name? Any connection to real-world science?

Dave C.

It is a very real idea! And, like most very real ideas or historical events/people, we amp them up and sci-fi them a bit, but always with an eye toward keeping them sort of plausible. It’s a tough balance to maintain. Like, a little later in the series, you’ll see Doctor Lu talk about zero-point energy, and what he says isn’t strictly correct, but the ways that it’s incorrect respects what’s true and real about zero-point energy theories. Basically, we try to write stuff like that so that a knowledgeable person could read it and go “That’s not quite right, but they did their research, so it’s wrong on purpose instead of just stupid.”

Usually when you see zero-point energy pop up in sci-fi stories, it’s being used as an excuse to allow for absurdly magical events to happen. Which is fine, it’s just not what we’re doing. When we borrow concepts from reality, be they historical people or events or theories, we like to keep our versions of them a little more grounded to show our respect for the real people responsible for these things in the first place. The way we see it, they never gave us permission to play with their toys, as it were, so this approach is our way of handling their accomplishments with care. We don’t know if anyone notices or cares that we do things like this, but it just feels right.

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